How to Stop Deer Damage to Fall Landscape - NoVa Deer Shield
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Oak Trees, Deer and Acorns

Oak Trees, Deer and Acorns

Are you noticing more deer damage to your landscaping?  It could be because of oak trees.

Fall is the time of year all animals are preparing for winter.  Bucks have finished growing their antlers, does have weaned their young and fawns need to prepare for their first winter.  This means that food intake is up.  White tail deer need to store fat to convert to energy to survive the winter.  One way to store fat is by eating carbohydrates!

Acorns provide about 25% of a white tail deer’s autumn intake.  Acorns are low in protein (6%) but high in carbohydrates (42%) and fats (52%).  Consuming acorns now will provide a white-tail deer the stores they need to survive the winter.  Carbohydrates are only second to water in nutritional needs for the deer.

Fall Deer Landscape Damage Is All About Acorns

It may surprise you that deer do have favorite acorns!  Acorns have tannic acid.  While deer like all acorns, white oaks are the lowest in tannic acid and a favorite to white tail deer.  These trees, however, only produce a “bumper crop” every few years but red oaks fill in by producing heavily every other year.  To learn more about favorite choices of acorns or tree production you can read this article at Realtree.com or nyantler-outdoors.com.

Deer can smell acorns.  If you have a tree in your yard, it is no doubt you are seeing more deer.  While browsing for acorns it never fails, they stop to taste the roses or nibble on another green to balance their nutritional needs.

At NoVa Deer Shield we find ourselves busy trying to stop deer damage to landscaping by refocusing the deer on the acorns. In winter, we change the product used.

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